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Sport Injuries

Playing sports falls on an example rating however each activity does pose a risk for specific foot and ankle injuries.  Past this patient will go through some sports injuries specific to that sports action.

Running in shoes appears to increase the risk of ankle sprains, either by decreasing awareness of foot position or by increasing the twisting torque on the ankle during a stumble.

Barefoot running is running while barefoot, without wearing any shoes on the feet. Running in thin-soled, flexible shoes is related but differs in some ways. Minimalist-style running is comparable to barefoot running in that the shoe gear aims at protecting the bottoms of the foot only but mimics running barefoot. This is accomplished by having minimal to no heel drop in the shoe and no arch or structural support. Running in traditional shoes is quite different and contrasted with barefoot running by having shock absorption in a well-cushioned heel and often a built-in arch support.

Proponents for barefoot running would state that:

Running in shoes appears to increase the risk of ankle sprains, either by decreasing awareness of foot position or by increasing the twisting torque on the ankle during a stumble. Running in shoes appears to increase the risk of plantar fasciitis because there is a difference in the heel of the shoe compared to the toes. Running in shoes appears to increase chronic injuries of the lower limb, such as IT band tendonitis and hip and knee arthritis. It modifies the transfer of shock to muscles and supporting structures because the foot strike is in front of the body’s center of gravity, whereas with barefoot running style, the body position is more vertical or upright.

Common injuries associated with barefoot running:

Your feet and ankles take a beating when you’re playing baseball. Baseball players should be aware of the following risks. Ankle sprains may occur while running, fielding balls, stepping on or sliding into bases. Sprains should be evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon to determine the extent of injury, including possible peroneal tendon injuries or fractures. The foot and ankle surgeon will develop a treatment plan: failure to fully treat and rehabilitate a sprain may lead to chronic ankle instability and recurrent sprains.

Overuse or excessive training may sideline some athletes with Achilles tendinopathy or heel pain (often plantar fasciitis, or calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents). Contusions may occur from impact with the ball or contact with other players.

Cleats may pose challenges in the forefoot and aggravation of neuromas, sesamoids, bunions and hammertoes. To stay at the top of your game, ensure that cleats are fitted properly and have injuries evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon.

One of the most common injuries seen in pitchers and catchers is ingrown toenails. If the nails are cut too short or at an angle, the torque and demand on the toes as they help balance the foot can lead to ingrown. If ignored, this can lead to a nail infection (paronychia) and cellulitis (a potentially serious bacterial skin infection).

Feet and ankles take a beating in basketball! Injuries can occur from running, jumping, cutting, quick starts and stops, and direct contact with other players. Basketball players should be aware of the following:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries, fractures, and chronic ankle instability. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents. One of the most common injuries is a Jones fractures, which is a fracture of the fifth metatarsal base. This can be due to the chronic impact of the ballistic activity, running and jumping, as well as the athlete’s foot structure.

Dancing places more physical demand on the foot and ankle and increases their risk of injury. Ballet dancers also have added risk of foot and ankle injury because of specific positions, such as en pointe and demi-pointe, which can add stress to the toes and ball of the foot.

Common dancer’s injuries include:

Dancer’s Fracture or fifth metatarsal fracture is often the result of landing awkwardly on the outside portion of the foot or twisting the ankle. Lateral Ankle Sprain is a common injury among athletes. This may happen from landing awkwardly from a jump or twisting the ankle. Bunions (Hallux Valgus) do not usually develop because of dancing but may be exacerbated by tight-fitting shoes and repetitive irritation to the big toe joint. Stress Fractures may happen from too much repetitive loading (activity) of the foot, which causes the bones to weaken. This may cause pain and swelling. Ankle Impingement Syndrome, may be anterior or posterior (front or back) of the ankle and is related to bone structures that pinch the soft tissue when the ankle is pointed in one direction or the other.

Trigger Toe/Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis results from the inability of a tendon to glide within its canal, thus causing it to get stuck. This results in the big toe not being able to move freely through its range of motion and sometimes getting stuck in one position. Sesamoiditis, Hallux Rigidus, Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis all are related to overuse and repetitive trauma. We do provide examination and clearance for on-point if needed.

The running and side-to-side cutting in field hockey are common causes of injuries to the foot and ankle. Field hockey players should be aware of the following risks:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures. Ankle fractures, metatarsal fractures and Lisfranc fractures can sideline athletes and sometimes require surgery. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD), calcaneal apophysitis and metatarsalgia/capsulitis in children and adolescents.

Although golf does not involve running or jumping, injuries can occur to the foot and ankle. Golfers should be aware of the following risks:

Heel pain (or plantar fasciitis) can be exacerbated by excessive walking on the golf course. The golf swing can also place stress on the feet and ankles. Common complaints are especially noted to the ball of the foot that pivots to help drive the golf club through the swing. The stress on the ball of the foot can cause metatarsalgia, capsulitis of the second toe, neuromas, increased pain in the great toe joint (often hallux rigidus) and sesamoiditis.

The running and side-to-side cutting in lacrosse are common causes of injuries to the foot and ankle. Lacrosse players should be aware of the following risks:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures. Ankle fractures, metatarsal fractures, Lisfranc fractures and turf toe can sideline athletes and sometimes require surgery. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents.

Rugby is hard on the feet and ankles! Injuries can occur from running and cutting, direct trauma during tackling and during the scrum. Rugby players should be aware of the following risks:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures.Ankle fractures, metatarsal fractures and Lisfranc fractures can sideline athletes and sometimes require surgery.Contusions and bone bruises may also result from high impact during tackling. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents.

Whether an athlete is a recreational, competitive or elite runner, foot and ankle health is essential for optimal performance. Runners are susceptible to overuse injuries, including heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents.

Evaluation by a foot and ankle surgeon will help the athlete determine the underlying cause of pain and the best course of treatment. Custom orthotic devices are often used for treatment of these conditions.

Soccer is hard on the feet! Injuries to the foot and ankle can occur from running and side-to-side cutting, sliding or tackling and from striking the ball or another player with the foot. Soccer players should be aware of the following risks:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures. Ankle fractures, metatarsal fractures and Lisfranc fractures can sideline athletes and sometimes require surgery. Contusions and bone bruises may also result from high impact, such as in slide tackling. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents.

Tennis involves much foot work. Foot and ankle injuries can occur from the continuous side-to-side and quick stopping and starting motions required in this sport. The playing surface also plays a role, as hard courts are less forgiving compared to clay courts. Tennis players should be aware of the following risks:

Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis in children and adolescents.

The repetitive jumping and side-to-side movements required in volleyball increase the risk of injuries to the foot and ankle. Volleyball players should be aware of the following:

Inversion ankle sprains are a common injury in this sport. Ankle sprains should be evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon to determine the extent of the injury, including possible peroneal tendon injuries and fractures. The foot and ankle surgeon will develop a treatment plan: failure to fully treat and rehabilitate a sprain may lead to chronic ankle instability and recurrent sprains. Overuse and excessive training can lead to heel pain (plantar fasciitis), Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, stress fractures, posterior tibial tendonitis (or PTTD) and calcaneal apophysitis and capsulitis/synovitis in children and adolescents.

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Doc Martin’s Foot And Ankle Clincs are well known as one of the most technologically advanced foot and ankle practices in Michigan. Our physicians will carefully craft an individualized treatment plan that embraces your specific injury, anatomy, and even lifestyle (a critically important component when it comes to recovery). We never take a “cookie-cutter approach” to treatment.

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For our patients’ convenience, we have our own digital x-ray, MRI, Cat-scan, and ultrasound equipment at many of our podiatry clinics. Our on-site podiatric physical therapy clinics allow for constant communication between the physicians and physical therapists, ensuring the most effective therapy and successful recovery for our patients.

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